Newsstand Sophisticate

Jul 8
“In ‘Scènes de la vie de bohème,’ [Henry Murger] succeeded beyond his ambition. He succeeded not only in writing a popular book, one that was translated into twenty languages, successfully dramatized, candied into an opera, one that enabled its author to live in bourgeois comfort, but also in changing an image in the public mind. Grub Street, where dinnerless Gildon drew his venal quill, contemptible Grub Street, the haunt of apprentices and failures and Henry Murger, was transformed into glamorous bohemia. The unwilling expedient became a permanent way of life, became a cult with rituals and costumes, a doctrine adhered to not only by artists, young and old, rich and poor, but also in later years by designers, stylists, trade-paper sub-editors, interior decorators, wolves, fairies, millionaire patrons of art, sadists, nymphomaniacs, bridge sharks, anarchists, women living on alimony, tired reformers, educational cranks, economists, hopheads, dipsomaniac playwrights, nudists, restaurant keepers, stockbrokers, and dentists craving self-expression.” Malcolm Cowley, Exile’s Return

Jun 25

Jun 20

May 17
groveatlanticinc:

The folks over at PWxyz have come out with another literary pie chart, this time for Samuel Beckett’s trilogy (MOLLOY, MALONE DIES, THE UNNAMABLE). Fabulous.
http://bit.ly/10CUFeQ

Three percent stone sucking.

groveatlanticinc:

The folks over at PWxyz have come out with another literary pie chart, this time for Samuel Beckett’s trilogy (MOLLOY, MALONE DIES, THE UNNAMABLE). Fabulous.

http://bit.ly/10CUFeQ

Three percent stone sucking.


May 16
“Nothing is so firmly believed as that which least is known.”  Michel de Montaigne (via berfrois)

Apr 26
wordpainting:

“Don’t be amazed if you see my eyes always wandering. In fact, this is my way of reading, and it is only in this way that reading proves fruitful to me. If a book truly interests me, I cannot follow it for more than a few lines before my mind, having seized on a thought that the text suggests to it, or a feeling, or a question, or an image, goes off on a tangent and springs from thought to thought, from image to image, in an itinerary of reasonings and fantasies that I feel the need to pursue to the end, moving away from the book until I have lost sight of it. The stimulus of reading is indispensable to me, and of meaty reading, even if, of every book, I manage to read no more than a few pages. But those few pages already enclose for me whole universes, which I can never exhaust.” ― Italo Calvino, If on a Winter’s Night a Traveler

I need a T-shirt that says “READ ITALO CALVINO”.

wordpainting:

“Don’t be amazed if you see my eyes always wandering. In fact, this is my way of reading, and it is only in this way that reading proves fruitful to me. If a book truly interests me, I cannot follow it for more than a few lines before my mind, having seized on a thought that the text suggests to it, or a feeling, or a question, or an image, goes off on a tangent and springs from thought to thought, from image to image, in an itinerary of reasonings and fantasies that I feel the need to pursue to the end, moving away from the book until I have lost sight of it. The stimulus of reading is indispensable to me, and of meaty reading, even if, of every book, I manage to read no more than a few pages. But those few pages already enclose for me whole universes, which I can never exhaust.” ― Italo CalvinoIf on a Winter’s Night a Traveler

I need a T-shirt that says “READ ITALO CALVINO”.

(via unabridgedbookstore)


Apr 24
“Perhaps I should be more suspicious of my belief that there is inherent value in literature. It could be pure, self-serving, soft-brained romanticism, the belief that probing the most delicate and subtle areas of the mind by, say, listening to music or reading will develop what’s human in you. There are abundant examples of reactionary, loony, virulently prejudiced artists and art lovers, so one can hardly insist that art is definitively good for the brain. But I believe that a lack of art is really bad for the brain. Art itself is inherently subversive. It’s destabilizing. It undermines, rather than reinforces, what you already know and what you already think. It is the opposite of propaganda. It ventures into distant ambiguities, it dismantles the received in your brain and refines what you can experience.” Deborah Eisenberg, “The Art of Fiction No. 218,” The Paris Review No. 204, Spring 2013

Apr 15

(via carasala)


Apr 11

(via maudelynn)


Apr 2